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Food for Thought(s)

Updated: Oct 2, 2021





Videos on soil science (personally haven't watched yet but I know a bit about):


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https://aeon.co/essays/animals-wrestle-with-the-concept-of-death-and-mortality?utm_source=pocket-newtab


Humans have long thought of themselves as the only animal with a notion of mortality. Our concept of death is one of those characteristics, like culture, rationality, language or morality, that have traditionally been taken as definitional of the human species – setting us apart from the natural world and justifying our boundless use and exploitation of it. However, as I have argued elsewhere, the widespread notion that only humans can understand death stems from an overly complex view of this concept. The human concept of death is not necessarily the only concept of death.


Understanding death does not require grasping its inevitability or its unpredictability, nor does it require understanding that death applies to all living things or being familiar with its underlying physiological causes. In minimal terms, the concept of death is simply made up of two notions: non-functionality and irreversibility. This means that all an animal needs to grasp in order for us to be able to credit her with some understanding of death is that dead individuals don’t do the sorts of things that living beings of her kind usually do (ie, non-functionality) and that this is a permanent state (ie, irreversibility). This minimal concept of death requires very little cognitive complexity and is likely to be very widespread in the animal kingdom.


The opossum’s death display, also known as thanatosis, is an excellent demonstration of this, not because of what it tells us about the opossum’s mind, but because of what it shows us about the minds of her predators: animals such as coyotes, racoons, dogs, foxes, raptors, bobcats and large snakes. In the same way that the appearance of the stick insect tells us something about how her predators see the world, and which sorts of objects they avoid eating, the opossum’s thanatosis reveals how common the concept of death is likely to be among the animals that feed on her.


- Yeah...this summer while in our little pool in the backyard, a branch broke from one of the nearby trees and a bird fell to the ground. *creeak. thumpb. pain and hurt*. Another bird nearby - started crying out and went down and visited her/his partner. Was very sad. We're starting to learn animals are so much smarter than we once thought. There also super important and it's amazing how connected everything really is in the natural world and how ecosystems work.


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Good no great vids:


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The truth prevails. Why are we spending so much on the military again while the U.S. has SO many problems itself and is seemingly collapsing and coming undone at the seams?! The dollar is going to collapse (probably) and then what? That's why we spend on the military and keep pushing neoliberalism (which has won) and will suppress socialism and try to keep people thinking in certain frameworks only (like socialism does away with capitalism or even usury...)


Noam:



Learning...


Don't be an extremist...democracy, human (humane, humanitarian), cooperation, purifying the heart...the higher values of life.


I just love this: https://medium.com/the-gentle-revolution/goodbye-democracy-and-capitalism-355b68ae5147




-----------ISLAM - my religion, my beliefs...(some of) -- Peace ---



Love Sheikh Hamzu Yusuf, Mufti Menk, Dr. Omar Suleiman, Dr. Zakir Naik...all Muslims who I've met on FB or real life. Answer to no one except God. Simple but hard and complex, especially in practice and in certain life circumstances (especially in America, being a lower-class male and going from being an atheist to a Muslim - I've learned a lot though and am getting better).





Good channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/BloggingTheology

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